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Environmental impact assessment and the Church that never was
In 2010 Dr. Charles Mount prepared the Cultural Heritage component of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for a waste facility in Co. Dublin. A church and Holy Well were noted close by at Kilshane in the Record of Monuments and were listed as a Protected Structures in the Fingal County Development Plan. The identification of this site as Church and Holy Well was a result of it being indicated on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map as Church Well, the area immediate to the south as old burying ground and the whole field as Church Field. However, examination of the Ordnance Survey mapping did not indicate a structure that might be the remains of a church. Examination of aerial photography also failed to indicate a church.

Assessment of seventeenth century historical mapping also failed to indicate a church. The examination of the primary historical source material, the Crede Mihi of 1275, the ecclesiastical taxation of 1307, the extent of the Manor of Finglas of 1326, as well as The Ordnance Survey Names Books and the Ordnance Survey Letters indicated that there was no historical reference to a church at the site. Nor was there a church mentioned in any of the secondary historical works such as Walsh (1888) Fingal and Its Churches. The placename Kil, which often means church, need not do so in this case as it can also refer to a coil or wood.

Therefore the identification of a church site at the location appears to be based on an error in the preparation of the 1st edition of the Ordnance Survey mapping. A large Early Medeival burial ground was identified in Kilshane townland in 1988 just 900m from this location. It seems likely that local residents who were aware of this cemetery as a result of agricultural activity informed the Ordnance Survey personnel who inadvertently paced it on the map in the wrong part of the townland. The result was legal that protection was provided to a church that never was.

   
Projects
The environmental impact assessment of Cam Quarry, Co. Roscommon
The development of a new quarry at Cam, Co. Roscommon near Athlone lead to the archaeological assessment of an extensive area of pre-modern field systems.
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Brownstown Quarry Project
Since 2003 Dr. Charles Mount has been project managing the multi-period archaeological investigations at Brownstown, Co. Kildare. Summaries of the investigations carried out at the site are appended.
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Archaeological impact assessment of a quarry at Killough, Co. Tipperary
Continuing development at Killough, Co. Tipperary required the archaeological impact assessment (AIA)of the heritage in the surrounding area.
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